“Working Woman” by Michal Aviad (2018)

International update (10/10)

Working WomanGood dialogues, humor (8)
Excellent direction (9)
Top score: gender (10)

Adding a facet to the story of women facing sexual abuse in Israel (see her previous movie Invisible), Working Woman is a powerful movie on the many challenges a young woman faces when she wants to combine family life and career.

Cast: Liron Ben-Shlush, Menashe Noy, Oshri Cohen
Director: Michal Aviad
Writer: Michal Aviad, Sharon Azulay Eyal, Michal Vinik
Cinematographer: Daniel Miller
Editor: Nili Feller

“The Third Wife” by Ash Mayfair (2018)

International update (6/10)

Monday’s first feature

the third wifeGood script, images (8)
Top score: gender (10)

A story that cleverly brings into perspective the consequences that Confucian (read patriarchal) ideology has on women (here in Vietnam). Their existence is not only meant to serve their master, but they could only acquire some status within their household when giving birth to a son
Interestingly, the male roles are not at all relevant to the story. On exception: the only son of the household is instable and in disarray, in complete contrast to the state of (forced) harmony created by women
Despite the beauty, care , and hard work that these women provide, they cannot escape the harsh demands men impose on them: one commits suicide, the other kills her baby girl, a third one wants to become a boy…
Very slow, at times too placid

Cast: Hong Chuong Nguyen, Long Le Vu, Nu Yên-Khê Tran
Director: Ash Mayfair
Writer: Ash Mayfair
Music by An Ton That
Cinematography by Chananun Chotrungroj
Film Editing by Julie Béziau

“Thirst” (Jajda) by Svetla Tsotsorkova (2015)

International update (1/10)

Monday’s First Feature

Thirst
Good images and music (8)
Excellent script, personages, dialogues, direction, and content (9)

A movie about climate change and environmental damage, but the title “Thirst” does not only refer to the lack of water but also to sexual thirst
Great direction: the Images do not need dialogues to say a lot. An exceptionnal first feature!

Cast: Monika Naydenova, Alexander Benev, Svetlana Yancheva
Director: Svetla Tsotsorkova
Writers: Svetoslav Ovtcharov, Svetla Tsotsorkova, Ventsislav Vasilev
Music by Hristo Namliev
Cinematography by Vesselin Hristov
Film Editing by Nina Altaparmakova, Svetla Tsotsorkova

“Chutney Popcorn” by Nisha Ganatra (1999)

Nisha Ganatra (2/2)

Fridays Classics

First Feature

Chutney PopcornGood script (8)
Excellent content (9)

Amateuristic direction and performances, but fun and smart. An inspired debut!

Cast: Nisha Ganatra, Jill Hennessy, Sakina Jaffrey
Director: Nisha Ganatra
Writers: Susan Carnival, Nisha Ganatra
Music by Karsh Kale
Cinematography by Erin King
Film Editing by Jane Pia Abramowitz

“Wrestling Ernest Hemingway” by Randa Haines (1993)

The Work of Randa Haines (3/6)

Wrestling Ernest HemingwayGood script, dialogues, humor, music (8)
Excellent direction (9)
Top personages, images (10)

Two retired men in Florida form a friendship despite their differences
A touching movie on old age and loneliness / Great acting

Cast: Sandra Bullock, Robert Duvall, Shirley MacLaine, Richard Harris, Piper Laurie
Directed by Randa Haines
Music by Michael Convertino
Cinematography by Lajos Koltai
Film Editing by Paul Hirsch

“Children Of A Lesser God” by Randa Haines (1986)

The Work of Randa Haines (1/6)

Mondays First Feature

children of a lesser godGood dialogues, humor, music
Excellent script, personages, direction, images
Top score: minorities, message (10)

Great female lead, great humor
“Do you think there’s a place where we can meet, not in silence, and not in sound?”

Cast: William Hurt, Marlee Matlin, Piper Laurie, Philip Bosco, Allison Gompf
Directed by Randa Haines
Screenplay by Hesper Anderson, Mark Medoff
Photographed by John Seale
Edited by Lisa Fruchtman
Music by Michael Convertino

“Gas, Food, Lodging” by Allison Anders (1993)

Facets of Fatherhood (5/10)
Fridays Classics

Gas, Food, LodgingGood script, direction, images, dialogues (8) Excellent personages (9)
Top score: minorities (10)

Surprising!

Cast: Brooke Adams, Ione Skye, Fairuza Balk
Director: Allison Anders
Writers: Richard Peck (novel), Allison Anders (screenplay)
Music by J. Mascis
Cinematography by Dean Lent
Film Editing by Tracy Granger

“Hemel” by Sacha Polak (2012)

Facets of Fatherhood (3/10)

First Feature

hemelGood script, dialogues, humor, images, music
Excellent personages, direction

Top score: gender (10)

A young woman who leads a promiscuous life like her father that she emulates feels suddenly lost and abandoned when her father falls in love
An impressive debut over the meaning of love
Great score, and a “stunning, star-making performance, which, in one striking close-up after another, sharply captures the fear and pain of having to let go and grow up.”
Polak’s episodic tale has a dreaminess marked by shots that drift in and out of focus to convey Hemel’s retreat from real feeling into vulgar sex talk, or tilt from right to left on a fixed axis to suggest that she’s careening out of control.” [Nick Schager

Cast: Hannah Hoekstra, Hans Dagelet, Rifka Lodeizen
Director: Sacha Polak
Writer: Helena van der Meulen (screenplay)
Cinematography by Daniël Bouquet
Film Editing by Axel Skovdal Roelofs

“Lost and Delirious” by Lea Pool (2001)

Facets of motherhood (3/5)

Lost and DeliriousGood direction, images, music (8)
Top score: personages, dialogues, gender (9)

“a hymn to teenage idealism and hormones” (Roger Ebert)
The usual Lea Pool’s family situations – difficult but crucial mother-daughter relationships and absent fathers – play a role in the background

Cast: Piper Perabo, Jessica Pare, Jackie Burroughs
Directed by Lea Pool
Written by Judith Thompson
Music by Robyn Schulkowsky
Cinematography by Jeanne Lapoirie
Film Editing by Michel Arcand

“Queen of Hearts” by May el-Toukhy (2019)

May el-Toukhy (2/2)

Queen of HeartsTop score: script, dialogues, direction, images, music, gender (8)

A middle-aged mother starts a relationship with her stepson, but pushes him to suicide to prevent him from destroying her family.
One critic saw Anne (Trine Dyrholm) as “one of the most complicated female villains of recent memory.” I saw a woman who seeks to fulfill unsatisfied sexual needs, but realizes when it’s too late that she will lose her daughters. The price to pay for her sexual escapade is too high, and she fights to the most dramatic end. A man who would have sex with the (adult) daughter of his ex-wife would not be punished as harshly…

Cast: Trine Dyrholm, Gustav Lindh, Magnus Krepper
Director: May el-Toukhy
Writers: Maren Louise Käehne, May el-Toukhy
Music by Jon Ekstrand
Cinematography by Jasper Spanning
Film Editing by Rasmus Stensgaard Madsen

“Beautiful Kate” by Rachel Ward (2009)

Rachel Ward (1/2)

Beautiful Kate

Top score: gender (9)

Interesting story but the way it is structured around flashbacks keeps the personages at a distance. Pity!

Cast: Ben Mendelsohn, Sophie Lowe, Maeve Dermody
Director: Rachel Ward
Writers: Rachel Ward (screenplay), Newton Thornburg (novel)
Music by Murray Paterson, Tex Perkins
Cinematography by Andrew Commis
Film Editing by Veronika Jenet

“Jinn” by Nijla Mumin (2018)

Mondays First Feature

JinnTop score: minorities, message (10)

Coming of age? This movie puts it the other way around, as  Summer, a 16-year-old girl, wants to fulfill her (contagious) desire to discover the world around her and experience religion (Islam), dance, sex, and everything that triggers her interest. After the necessary clashes, parents and peers eventually support her, understanding that the freedom that is paramount to her age cannot tolerate any compromise. Whose coming of age is it, thus?
Khalil Gibran’s poetic image – children are arrows that parents shoot and have then to follow – comes to mind. Young people show us the way! Today, this could be our new reality: think about Greta Grünberg and many others in Hong-Kong and elsewhere… I love it!

The songs are great, but the constant (and unnecessary) ‘atmosphere’ music deprives the movie of some of its sharpness
Great acting by Zoe Renee: “Renee and Missick’s performances are so remarkable and the story is so compelling, I left the movie with a new feeling: hope that audiences watching this movie may be more empathetic towards others’ life changes.” [Monica Castillo]

Cast:  Zoe Renee, Simone Missick, Kelvin Harrison Jr., Dorian Missick, Hisham Tawfiq, Kelly Jenrette, Ashlei Foushee, Damien D. Smith, Maya Morales
Director: Nijla Mu’min
Writer: Nijla Mu’min
Cinematographer: Bruce Francis Cole
Editor: Collin Kriner
Composer: Jesi Nelson

“A Soap” by Pernille Fischer Christensen (2006)

The work of Pernille Fischer Christensen (1/5)

First Feature

a-soapTop score: gender (10)

A transitory phase in the life of a woman who leaves her husband and meets a transgender woman.
The theme “How can one love someone like that?” will be further developed in Christensen’s next feature Dancers
First movie written by Kim Fupz Aakeson and Pernille Fischer Christensen

Cast: Trine Dyrholm, David Dencik, Frank Thiel
Director: Pernille Fischer Christensen
Writers: Kim Fupz Aakeson, Pernille Fischer Christensen

“Exhibition” by Joanna Hogg (2013)

movies with excellent music

exhibitionTop score: music (10)

Complex movie with no clear-cut line to help you find your way through its multiple layers / complexity enhanced by the very special touch of Helle le Fevre
Houses and locations (not to mention distribution of space) play an important role in Joanna Hogg’s work: a Tuscan villa in Unrelated, a Cornwall cottage in Archipelago, a modern architectural house in London.
Excellent work on image, sound, content

Cast: Viv Albertine, Liam Gillick, Tom Hiddleston
Director: Joanna Hogg
Writers: Joanna Hogg
Cinematography by Ed Rutherford
Film Editing by Helle le Fevre

“All That Matters Is Past” by Sara Johnsen (2012)

Sara Johnsen (3/3)

all that matters is pastTop score: message (10)

A complex story in which the personages who seem to be victims are responsible and those who seem to be responsible might just be victims
Almost exclusively filmed in the wilderness
The Norwegian title ‘Uskyld’ means “innocence”

Cast: Maria Bonnevie, Inga Berger Schou, Tea Sandanger
Director: Sara Johnsen
Writer: Sara Johnsen
Music by Fernando Velázquez
Cinematography by John Andreas Andersen
Film Editing by Zaklina Stojcevska

“All Inclusive” by Hella Joof (2014)

Hella Joof (2/2)

All InclusiveTop score: humor, direction, gender, message (7)

Weak scenario

Cast: Mikael Birkkjær, Rasmus Bjerg, Carsten Bjørnlund
Director: Hella Joof
Writer: Mette Heeno
Music by Flemming Nordkrog
Cinematography by Kim Høgh
Film Editing by Cathrine Ambus

“Hush Little Baby” by Hella Joof (2009)

Hella Joof (1/2)

Hush Little BabyTop: gender (10)

Excellent movie showing different facets of child abuse

Cast: Malou Reymann, Stephanie Leon, Julie Grundtvig Wester
Director: Hella Joof
Writers: Ida Maria Rydén, Hella Joof
Music by Povl Kristian
Cinematography by Kim Høgh
Film Editing by Cathrine Ambus

“My Days Of Mercy” by Tali Shalom-Ezer (2017)

Tali Shalom-Ezer (2/2)

My days of mercyTop: dialogues, minorities, message (10)

Excellent dialogues and great performances in a not straightforward issue-movie

Cast: Kate Mara, Ellen Page, Elias Koteas, Beau Knapp, Amy Seimetz, Jake Robinson
Director: Tali Shalom-Ezer
Writer: Joe Barton
Music by Michael Brook
Cinematography by Radek Ladczuk
Film Editing by Einat Glaser-Zarhin

“Princess” by Tali Shalom-Ezer (2014)

Tali Shalom-Ezer (1/2)

First Feature

PrincessTop: gender (8)

Original look at a young girl who reaches puberty and discovers that sex is everywhere
A movie that shows a mother’s incapicity to communicate with her daughter and her boyfriend
Unclear frontier between gender and an animalistic approach to sex

A movie that very wrongly normalizes rape and child abuse!

Cast: Shira Haas, Keren Mor, Ori Pfeffer
Director: Tali Shalom-Ezer
Writer: Tali Shalom-Ezer
Music by Ishai Adar
Cinematography by Radek Ladczuk
Film Editing by Neta Dvorkis

“Rambling Rose” by Martha Coolidge (1991)

Friday classics
The work of Martha Coolidge (3/6)

rambling rose

Very good movie about the bias with which men consider(ed?) female sexuality
Good cast, subtle script.
The film could have done without the flashback at the beginning and at the end

Cast: Laura Dern, Robert Duvall, John Heard, Diane Ladd, Lukas Haas
Directed by Martha Coolidge
Writers: Calder Willingham
Photographed by Johnny E. Jensen
Edited by Steve Cohen
Music by Elmer Bernstein

“Fort Bliss” by Claudia Myers (2014)

Fort Bliss

A movie about the challenges a woman faces when she wants to pursue a career in the army and wants to be a mother at the same time

Cast: Michelle Monaghan, Emmanuelle Chriqui, Pablo Schreiber, Ron Livingston
Writer: Claudia Myers
Director: Claudia Myers
Music by Asche & Spencer
Cinematography by Adam Silver
Film Editing by Matt Chesse, Carsten Kurpanek

“The Sower” (Le Semeur) by Marine Francen (2017)

First Feature

The Sower

When all the men of the village have been taken away (for political reasons), the women have to learn to survive on their own… A beautiful story about love, desire, and solidarity

Cast: Pauline Burlet, Géraldine Pailhas, Alban Lenoir
Director: Marine Francen
Writers: Marine Francen, Jacqueline Surchat, Jacques Fieschi
Music by Frédéric Vercheval
Cinematography by Alain Duplantier
Film Editing by Minori Akimoto

“Exhibition” by Joanna Hogg (2013)

The impressive work of Joanna Hogg (3/4)

exhibitionTop score: music (10)

Complex movie with no clear-cut line to help you find your way through its multiple layers / complexity enhanced by the very special touch of Helle le Fevre
Houses and locations (not to mention distribution of space) play an important role in Joanna Hogg’s work: a Tuscan villa in Unrelated, a Cornwall cottage in Archipelago, a modern architectural house in London.
Excellent work on image, sound, content

Cast: Viv Albertine, Liam Gillick, Tom Hiddleston
Director: Joanna Hogg
Writers: Joanna Hogg
Cinematography by Ed Rutherford
Film Editing by Helle le Fevre

“Valley Girl” by Martha Coolidge (1983)

Friday Classics
Martha Coolidge (1/6)

Valley Girlhumor + music 8

A variation on Romeo and Juliet set in Hollywood, in which Romeo is the punk Randy and Julie the Valley girl. The editing is clumsy, but the leads are great
Good use of music to express the cultural divide / Good humor

And here’s one more nice thing about “Valley Girl.” Maybe because it was directed by a woman, Martha Coolidge, this is one of the rare Teenager Movies that doesn’t try to get laughs by insulting and embarrassing teenage girls.” [Roger Ebert]
However very disappointing, the movie ends with Randy (a young Nicolas Cage) conquering Julie (Deborah Foreman) by beating the hell out of his concurrent, Tommy (Michael Bowen). What a pity!

Cast: Nicolas Cage, Deborah Foreman, Elizabeth Daily, Michael Bowen, Colleen Camp
Directed by Martha Coolidge
Written by Andrew Lane, Wayne Crawford
Photographed by Fredrick Elmes
Music by Marc Levinthal, Scott Wilk
Film Editing by Éva Gárdos

“Une Histoire Banale” by Audrey Estrougo (2014)

The work of Audrey Estrougo (2/3)

Une histoire banalegender + message 10

Inside the destructive consequences of rape

Cast: Marie Denarnaud, Marie-Sohna Condé, Oumar Diaw
Director: Audrey Estrougo
Writer: Audrey Estrougo
Music by James Edjouma
Cinematography by Guillaume Schiffman
Film Editing by Céline Cloarec

“Ain’t Scared” (Regarde-Moi) by Audrey Estrougo (2007)

The work of Audrey Estrougo (1/3)
first feature

Ain't Scaredgender + minorities 10

The first half exposes the boys’ point of view, the second half the girls’, a much more dangerous one at that… 
Strong debut!

Cast: Emilie de Preissac, Eye Haidara, Lili Canobbio-Mouly
Director: Audrey Estrougo
Writer: Audrey Estrougo
Music by Baptiste Charvet
Cinematography by Guillaume Schiffman
Film Editing by Marie-Pierre Renaud

“Booksmart” by Olivia Wilde (2019)

Mondays first feature

Booksmartgender + minorities 9

Begins just like any other high-school movie, but the surprises pile up quickly
Fun!

Cast: Kaitlyn Dever, Beanie Feldstein, Mason Gooding, Skyler Gisondo, Victoria Ruesga, Billie Lourd, Molly Gordon, Jason Sudeikis
Director: Olivia Wilde
Writers: Emily Halpern, Sarah Haskins, Susanna Fogel, Katie Silberman
Cinematographer: Jason McCormick
Editor: Jamie Gross
Composer: Dan Nakamura

“The Pursuit Of Unhappiness” by Sherry Hormann (2012)

The work of Sherry Hormann (3/4)

The Pursuit Of Unhappinessimages 8

A philosophical comedy inspired by “The Pursuit of Unhappiness” by Paul Watzlawick

Cast: Johanna Wokalek, Iris Berben, Richy Müller
Director: Sherry Hormann
Writers: Paul Watzlawick (book), Sherry Hormann (screenplay)
Music by Stéphane Moucha, Maurus Ronner
Cinematography by Wojciech Szepel
Film Editing by Clara Fabry, Sandy Saffeels

“Ava” by Léa Mysius (2017)

Mondays first feature

Avaminorities/message 9

Although not always realistic, this subversive coming of age story shows how impermeable to social norms a young girl can be.

Cast: Noée Abita, Laure Calamy, Juan Cano
Director: Léa Mysius
Writers: Léa Mysius, Paul Guilhaume
Music by Florencia Di Concilio
Cinematography by Paul Guilhaume
Film Editing by Pierre Deschamps

“But I’m A Cheerleader” by Jamie Babbit (1999)

Friday Classics

First Feature

But I'm a Cheerleader

 

A good comedy about homosexuality / lots of humor, great music

Cast: Natasha Lyonne, Clea Duvall, Cathy Moriarty, Rupaul Charles, Michelle Williams
Directed by Jamie Babbit
Written by Brian Wayne Peterson
Music by Pat Irwin
Cinematography by Jules Labarthe
Film Editing by Cecily Rhett

“The Quiet” by Jamie Babbit (2005)

The Quiet

A few impressive scenes and strong moments but nothing that holds the movie together: weak personages, dichotomic soundtrack, and a plot that goes nowehere

Cast: Camilla Belle, Elisha Cuthbert, Edie Falco
Director: Jamie Babbit
Writers: Abdi Nazemian, Micah Schraft
Music by Jeff Rona
Cinematography by M. David Mullen
Film Editing by Joan Sobel

“Concussion” by Stacie Passon (2013)

First Feature

Concussion

A 40+ lesbian woman decides to prop up her dormant sexual life with her wife, and becomes a hooker catering for other middle-aged women.
A subtle movie about the many finesses between a woman’s sexuality and intimacy
Finely directed – A promising first feature

Cast: Robin Weigert, Maggie Siff, Johnathan Tchaikovsky, Julie Fain Lawrence, Ben Shenkman, Janel Moloney, Daniel London
Director: Stacie Passon
Writer: Stacie Passon
Music by Barb Morrison
Cinematography by David Kruta
Film Editing by Anthony Cupo

“Daddy Issues” by Amara Cash (2018)

= First Feature =

daddy issues

At times stylish with some surprising camera movements and nice musical
moments, but the personages are made of papier-maché stuck in childish relationships + a script that’s going nowhere =a movie you’ll regret having seen

Cast: Madison Lawlor, Montana Manning, Andrew Pifko
Director: Amara Cash
Writers: Alex Bloom, Amara Cash
Music by Patrick Ridgen, Maxton Waller
Cinematography by Nico Aguilar
Film Editing by Amara Cash

“The Boynton Beach Bereavement Club” by Susan Seidelman (2005)

Susan Seidelman (3/3)

The Boynton Beach Bereavement Club

A comedy over middle class single seniors in search of a partner, filled with the usual clichés about romance and sex. Some say that is precisely the charm of this ‘cute’ movie: showing that seniors experience the same anxiety as teeners when it comes to romantic relationships and sex. Haven’t they learned anything during all their years?

Cast: Joseph Bologna, Dyan Cannon, Len Cariou, Sally Kellerman, Michael Nouri
Directed by Susan Seidelman
Written by Shelly Gitlow, Susan Seidelman
Music by Marcelo Zarvos
Cinematography by Eric Moynier
Film Editing by Keiko Deguchi

“Desperately Seeking Susan” by Susan Seidelman (1985)

Friday Classics

Susan Seidelman (1/3)

Desesperately Seeking Susan

Same type of movie as Seidelman’s first feature Smithereens – a girl drifting in New York in search of an identity – with a complex plot, humor, and great cast, but a less ‘personal’ scenario

Cast: Rosanna Arquette, Madonna, Aidan Quinn, Mark Blum, Robert Joy, Laurie Metcalf
Directed by Susan Seidelman
Screenplay by Leora Barish
Music by Thomas Newman
Cinematography by Edward Lachman
Film Editing by Andrew Mondshein

“All About Nina” by Eva Vives (2018)

A year’s favorites review

= First Feature =

All About Nina

Impressive first feature combining drama and comedy, depth and spontaneity; fantastic acting by Winstead
“Vives (and Winstead) really understand this prickly armored woman, a woman who weeps with sadness after a great night, whose anger isn’t obliterated magically by the possibility of joy. “All About Nina” understands that happiness can be extremely stressful. If you’re unused to happiness, you don’t know what to do with it. You may, in fact, deliberately torch it, just so you can get back to the misery that is familiar. Not too many films—really, not too many people—understand this dynamic.” [Sheila O’Malley]

Cast: Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Common, Chace Crawford, Clea Duvall, Kate del Castillo, Beau Bridges
Director: Eva Vives
Writer: Eva Vives
Cinematographer: Thomas Scott Stanton
Editor: Saira Haider, Susan Littenberg
Composer: John Dragonetti

“Enough Said” by Nicole Holofcener (2013)

A year’s favorites review

Enough Said

Excellent acting in a finely-tuned story about the life and relationships of a middle-aged divorced mother

Cast: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, James Gandolfini, Catherine Keener, Ben Falcone, Toni Collette, Amy Landecker, Michaela Watkins
Director: Nicole Holofcener
Writer: Nicole Holofcener
Music by Marcelo Zarvos
Cinematography by Xavier Grobet
Film Editing by Robert Frazen

“Me Without You” by Sandra Goldbacher (2001)

A year’s favorites review

me without you

A young woman has to break away from a lifelong but toxic friendship
Consistent personages and well-handled plot, but the musical choice is at times obnoxious (see The Governess)
As in her first feature, Jewish identity and high education characterize Goldbacher’s female lead.

Cast: Anna Friel, Michelle Williams, Oliver Milburn, Kyle MacLachlan, Trudie Styler, Marianne Denicourt
Directed by Sandra Goldbacher
Written by Laurence Coriat, Sandra Goldbacher
Music by Adrian Johnston, Amy Odell
Cinematography by Denis Crossan
Film Editing by Michael Ellis

“Let The Sunshine In” by Claire Denis (2017)

A year’s favorites

A post by Mireia Marti from Barcelona

Let the sunshine in

Claire Denis leads you to a place and leaves you wondering how you got there!
A movie about true love, extraordinarily cohesive, that breaks all rules! A masterpiece!
“The self-destructive nature of searching for meaning, for a partner, has long fascinated the filmmaker, and here she strips bare that hopeless pursuit.” by Greg Cwik.
“The film’s confidence comes in part from the acceptance of the things that can’t be known.” by Glenn Kenny.

Cast: Juliette Binoche, Xavier Beauvois, Philippe Katerine, Josiane Balasko, Gérard Depardieu, Alex Descas
Director: Claire Denis
Book: Roland Barthes
Screenplay: Claire Denis, Christine Angot
Director of Photography: Agnès Godard
Editor: Guy Lecorne
Original Music Composer: Stuart Staples

“Desert Hearts” by Donna Deitch (1985)

A year’s favorites

= First Feature =

Desert Hearts

The “fragile” acting adds an aura of sensitivity to the powerful characters
Excellent dialogues

As one personage says, “If one doesn’t play, one doesn’t win,” a phrase that defines the whole movie.

Cast: Helen Shaver, Patricia Charbonneau, Audra Lindley, Andra Akers, Gwen Welles
Produced and Directed by Donna Deitch
From A Screenplay by Natalie Cooper Based On A Novel by Jane Rule
Photographed by Robert Elswit
Edited by Robert Estrin

“The Miseducation Of Cameron Post” by Desiree Akhavan (2018)

A year’s favorites

The Miseducation Of Cameron Post

A magnificent illustration of the conflicts teenagers can have between what society and religion impose on them – who they should be and not be – and the identity they feel they possess
Another look on identity conflicts – See Appropriate Behavior

Cast: Chloë Grace Moretz, Sasha Lane, Forrest Goodluck, Jennifer Ehle, John Gallagher Jr., Owen Campbell, Quinn Shephard
Director: Desiree Akhavan
Writer (novel): Emily M. Danforth
Writer: Desiree Akhavan, Cecilia Frugiuele
Cinematographer: Ashley Connor
Editor: Sara Shaw
Composer: Julian Wass

“The Strange Color Of Your Body’s Tears” by Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani (2013)

L'étrange couleur des larmes de ton corps

Highly stylized, sexualized images, with dizzying camera and editing work on a very weak story

Cast: Klaus Tange, Jean-Michel Vovk, Sylvia Camarda, Sam Louwyck, Anna D’Annunzio
Director: Hélène Cattet, Bruno Forzani
Writer: Hélène Cattet, Bruno Forzani
Cinematography: Manuel Dacosse

“Bang Gang, A Modern Love Story” by Eva Husson (2015)

= First Feature =

Bang Gang

Lots of missed opportunities in this movie that could have been very interesting… but the bad script, mediocre direction, and a moralistic ending make you want to have watched something else

Cast: Marilyn Lima, Daisy Broom, Finnegan Oldfield, Lorenzo Lefèbvre, Fred Hotier
Director: Eva Husson
Writer: Eva Husson
Cinematographer: Mattias Troelstrup
Editor: Anders Refn
Composer: Morgan Kibby

“Desert Hearts” by Donna Deitch (1985)

The work of Donna Deitch (3/3)

= First Feature =

Desert Hearts

The “fragile” acting adds an aura of sensitivity to the powerful characters
Excellent dialogues

As one personage says, “If one doesn’t play, one doesn’t win,” a phrase that defines the whole movie.

Cast: Helen Shaver, Patricia Charbonneau, Audra Lindley, Andra Akers, Gwen Welles
Produced and Directed by Donna Deitch
From A Screenplay by Natalie Cooper Based On A Novel by Jane Rule
Photographed by Robert Elswit
Edited by Robert Estrin

“Loverboy” by Joan Micklin Silver (1989)

Joan Micklin Silver 2/4

Loverboy

A stupid but at times funny comedy

Cast: Patrick Dempsey, Kate Jackson, Robert Ginty
Director: Joan Micklin Silver
Writers: Robin Schiff, Tom Ropelewski, Leslie Dixon
Music by Michel Colombier
Cinematography by John Hora
Film Editing by Rick Shaine

“Half-Life” by Jennifer Phang (2008)

= First Feature =

half-life

A poetic movie about the incomprehensible world of adults seen through the eyes of a child
An original movie about a mother trying to maintain her family while escaping loneliness
A creative movie about how the environment affects our lives
An ambitious movie … with many facets to chew. Its estranged dialogues and the absence of background for its personages keep us at a distance

Cast: Sanoe Lake, Julia Nickson, Leonardo Nam
Director: Jennifer Phang
Writer: Jennifer Phang
Music by Michael S. Patterson
Cinematography by Aasulv Austad
Film Editing by Kristian Hansen, Gloria Vela, Harry Yoon

“The Children Of The Century” (Les Enfants Du Siècle) by Diane Kurys (1999)

Homage to Diane Kurys (2/6)

Les enfants du siècle

The passionate love story between two most venerated writers of their time, George Sand – I am a writer, not a woman who writes – and Alfred de Musset
A historical drama with themes close to the other works by Diane Kurys
Great acting and excellent dialogues

Cast: Juliette Binoche, Benoît Magimel, Stefano Dionisi
Director: Diane Kurys
Writers: Murray Head, Diane Kurys
Music by Luis Bacalov
Cinematography by Vilko Filac
Film Editing by Joële Van Effenterre

“Xiu Xiu: The Sent Down Girl” by Joan Chen (1998)

– First Feature –

Xiu Xiu The Sent Down Girl

A movie about various scales of abuse and about how corruption infiltrates even the most remote areas
“Xiu Xiu” will not be seen in China, nor is Chen welcome to return there at this time; it is the kind of film that in a simple parable indicts an entire nation and its sainted leader, Mao.” wrote Roger Ebert at the time. 
Mixing different musical styles does not favor the homogeneity of the movie

Cast:  Xiaolu Li, Lopsang, Zheng Qian, Gao Jie, Li Qianqian, Lu Yue
Directed by Joan Chen
Written by Joan Chen, Yan Geling
Music by Johnny Chen
Cinematography by Yue Lü
Film Editing by Lauren Himmelvo, Ruby Yang

“Lolo” by Julie Delpy (2015)

Lolo

Great humor and dialogues

Cast: Julie Delpy, Dany Boon, Vincent Lacoste, Karin Viard, Antoine Lounguine
Director: Julie Delpy
Writer: Julie Delpy, Eugénie Grandval
Cinematographer: Thierry Abrogast
Editor: Virginie Bruant
Composer: Matthieu Lamboley

“The Long Dumb Road” by Hannah Fidell (2018)

3 movies by Hannah Fidell (3)

the long dumb road

Predictable story of a not-yet-21 guy who learns in 2 days to come up for himself from an older fellow traveler
Weak dialogues and not much humor / Contrary to her preceding movie (6 Years), Hannah Fidell’s direction is here very light, almost impalpable.

Cast: Jason Mantzoukas, Tony Revolori, Taissa Farmiga, Casey Wilson, Ron Livingston, Grace Gummer
Director: Hannah Fidell
Writer: Hannah Fidell, Carson D. Mell
Cinematographer: Andrew Droz Palermo
Editor: Zach Clark
Composer: Keegan DeWitt

“6 Years” by Hannah Fidell (2015)

3 movies by Hannah Fidell (2)

6 years

The good acting compensates the stifling direction

Cast: Taissa Farmiga, Ben Rosenfield, Lindsay Burdge
Director: Hannah Fidell
Writer: Hannah Fidell
Music by Julian Wass
Cinematography by Andrew Droz Palermo
Film Editing by Carlos Marques-Marcet, Sofi Marshall

“A Teacher” by Hannah Fidell (2013)

3 movies by Hannah Fidell (1)

first feature

A Teacher

A woman who has a relationship with one of her students suddenly becomes obsessed with him and looses all sense of reality.
A very probable case of good old nineteenth-century hysteria!

Cast: Lindsay Burdge, Will Brittain, Jennifer Prediger, Jonny Mars, Julie Dell Phillips
Director: Hannah Fidell
Writer: Hannah Fidell
Music by Brian McOmber
Cinematography by Andrew Droz Palermo
Film Editing by Sofi Marshall

“Homesick” by Anne Sewitsky (2015)

Love obeys no rules
Three movies by Anne Sewitsky (3)

homesick

With this third movie, a recurring theme appears in transparency, as a watermark, through the work of Anne Sewitsky: love does not respect any (social) boundaries. In her first movie, all the personages transgress these limits. In her second movie, the “taboo” concerns the love of a ten-year old girl for a boy of her class. Finally, this third movie is about the incestuous love between a young woman and her half-brother. A series about trespassing love!
The Norwegian title of this third movie can be translated by “the nearest,”  a title that fits the movie much better than the official ‘public-pleasing ‘homesick’.
Again, an original musical score (although less so than in Happy, Happy)

Cast: Ine Marie Wilmann, Simon J. Berger, Anneke von der Lippe
Director: Anne Sewitsky
Writers: Anne Sewitsky, Ragnhild Tronvoll
Music by Ginge Anvik
Cinematography by Daniel Voldheim
Film Editing by Christoffer Heie

“Happy, Happy” by Anne Sewitsky (2010)

Love obeys no rules
Three movies by Anne Sewitsky (1)

first feature

happy, happy

A movie during which all the personages transgress their initial love-sex relationships.
Some loose ends and sketchy personages, but a self-assured touch and a sense of emotional drama with lots of potential.
Great use of music although the (musical) message has not been thoroughly thought of.
Winner of Sundance’s grand jury prize for world cinema, “Happy, Happy” is a very strange film. Yet I was happy to be watching. It is short and intense enough that it always seems on track, even if the train goes nowhere.” [Roger Ebert]

Cast: Agnes Kittelsen, Henrik Rafaelsen, Joachim Rafaelsen, Maibritt Saerens
Directed by Anne Sewitsky
Written by Ragnhild Tronvoll
Music by Stein Berge Svendsen
Cinematography by Anna Myking
Film Editing by Christoffer Heie

“Lovely Rita” by Jessica Hausner (2001)

Jessica Hausner, a work in progress

first feature

lovely rita

 

A teenager girl – who does everything ‘wrong’ because of her impossibility to communicate what she feels and what she wants – loses her only friend while discovering the excitements of sexuality, a real break in the boredom of the home and school aimless routine.
This first feature is about a girl who tries to escape the world imposed on her (home + school), a theme that recurs in Jessica Hausner’s following movies.

Cast: Barbara Osika, Christoph Bauer, Peter Fiala
Director: Jessica Hausner
Writer: Jessica Hausner
Cinematography by Martin Gschlacht
Film Editing by Karin Hartusch

“Waking Madison” by Katherine Brooks (2010)

Waking Madison

The psychological damage brought by religious extremism and sexual abuse

Cast: Imogen Poots, Elisabeth Shue, Taryn Manning
Director: Katherine Brooks
Writer: Katherine Brooks
Music by Klaus Badelt
Cinematography by Rob Sweeney
Film Editing by Richard Byard, Stuart H. Pappé

“The Party’s Just Beginning” by Karen Gillan (2018)

first feature

the party's just beginning

Impressive insight in Karen Gillan’s first feature

Cast: Karen Gillan, Lee Pace, Matthew Beard
Director: Karen Gillan
Writer: Karen Gillan (screenplay)
Music by Pepijn Caudron
Cinematography by Edd Lukas
Film Editing by Brett W. Bachman

“Nelly” by Anne Emond (2016)

nelly

The complex personality of a prostitute who became a successful writer (Nelly Arcan), rendered in a complex cinematographic puzzle

Cast: Mylène Mackay, Marie-Claude Guérin, Simon Alain
Director: Anne Émond
Writers: Nelly Arcan, Anne Émond
Cinematography by Josée Deshaies
Film Editing by Mathieu Bouchard-Malo

“Nuit #1” by Anne Emond (2011)

first feature

nuit #1

A young man meets a young woman. Both are haunted by the “mal de vivre” (sickness of living). Their sexual encounter turns into a series of introspective monologues that show how difficult it is to form one’s identity outside a given social context.
Strong acting!
The theme of sex and identity will find a new approach in Anne Emond’s Nelly (2018)

Cast: Catherine de Léan, Dimitri Storoge, Véronique Rebizov
Director: Anne Émond
Writer: Anne Émond
Cinematography by Mathieu Laverdière
Film Editing by Mathieu Bouchard-Malo

“Me Without You” by Sandra Goldbacher (2001)

me without you

A young woman has to break away from a lifelong but toxic friendship
Consistent personages and well-handled plot, but the musical choice is at times obnoxious (see The Governess)
As in her first feature, Jewish identity and high education characterize Goldbacher’s female lead.

Cast: Anna Friel, Michelle Williams, Oliver Milburn, Kyle MacLachlan, Trudie Styler, Marianne Denicourt
Directed by Sandra Goldbacher
Written by Laurence Coriat, Sandra Goldbacher
Music by Adrian Johnston, Amy Odell
Cinematography by Denis Crossan
Film Editing by Michael Ellis

“Zurich” by Sacha Polak (2015)

zurich

A morbid, uninspired, and pointless story!

Cast: Barry Atsma, Martijn Lakemeier, Tristan Göbel
Director: Sacha Polak
Writer: Helena van der Meulen
Music by Rutger Reinders
Cinematography by Frank van den Eeden
Film Editing by Axel Skovdal Roelofs

“Hemel” by Sacha Polak (2012)

first feature

hemel

A young woman who leads a promiscuous life like her father that she emulates feels suddenly lost and abandoned when her father falls in love
An impressive debut over the meaning of love
Great score, and a “stunning, star-making performance, which, in one striking close-up after another, sharply captures the fear and pain of having to let go and grow up.”
Polak’s episodic tale has a dreaminess marked by shots that drift in and out of focus to convey Hemel’s retreat from real feeling into vulgar sex talk, or tilt from right to left on a fixed axis to suggest that she’s careening out of control.” [Nick Schager

Cast: Hannah Hoekstra, Hans Dagelet, Rifka Lodeizen
Director: Sacha Polak
Writer: Helena van der Meulen (screenplay)
Cinematography by Daniël Bouquet
Film Editing by Axel Skovdal Roelofs

“Skate Kitchen” by Crystal Moselle (2018)

first feature

skate kitchen

An 18-year old girl joins a colorful group of girls, and while she skates with them, she learns what friendship means.
Cool because the movie shows “a younger generation [of women] that feels empowered to cross boundaries and to make their own world.” [Pat Brown]

Cast: Rachelle Vinberg, Jaden Smith, Elizabeth Rodriguez, Ardelia Lovelace, Nina Moran
Director: Crystal Moselle
Writer: Crystal Moselle, Aslihan Ünaldı, Jen Silverman
Cinematography: Shabier Kirchner
Music: Aska Matsumiya
Editor: Nico Leunen

“MDMA (Angie X)” by Angie Wang (2017)

first feature

mdma

The first hour is fireworks, the last half hour (starting with a long and boring Christmas scene with Christmas music) a boring bland story that transforms the lead into an inconsistent character. A pity!
The abundant racial cliches and a girl who returns to her daddy in the end left me with a bitter taste

Cast: Francesca Eastwood, Elisa Donovan, Pierson Fode
Director: Angie Wang
Writers: Angie Wang, Angie Wang
Music by Pei Pei Chung
Cinematography by Brett Pawlak
Film Editing by Jeff Castelluccio, Robert Schafer

 

“The Off Hours” by Megan Griffiths (2011)

first (public) feature

The Off Hours

Lonely people interacting with each other for no special reason, just to make sure that they’re still alive in a place haunted by failure / Loose lives that have no goals, no frills, just made bearable with sex and/or alcohol
“”The Off Hours” is set in the kind of place where dreams go to die.” [Jeff Shannon]
Excellent acting by Amy Steimetz

Cast: Amy Seimetz, Alice Bridgforth, Tony Doupe
Director: Megan Griffiths
Writer: Megan Griffiths
Music by Jeramy Koepping, Joshua Morrison
Cinematography by Benjamin Kasulke
Film Editing by Megan Griffiths

“Sadie” by Megan Griffiths (2018)

Sadie

A coming of age story in which a 13 year-old girl feels responsible for the people she cares for
Great acting by Sophia Mitri Schloss, her presence captivates

Cast: Sophia Mitri Schloss, Melanie Lynskey, John Gallagher Jr., Danielle Brooks, Tony Hale
Director: Megan Griffiths
Writer: Megan Griffiths
Cinematographer: T.J. Williams Jr.
Editor: Celia Beasley
Composer: Mike McCready

“The Miseducation Of Cameron Post” by Desiree Akhavan (2018)

The Miseducation Of Cameron Post

A magnificent illustration of the conflicts teenagers can have between what society and religion impose on them – who they should be and not be – and the identity they feel they possess
Another look on identity conflicts – See Appropriate Behavior

Cast: Chloë Grace Moretz, Sasha Lane, Forrest Goodluck, Jennifer Ehle, John Gallagher Jr., Owen Campbell, Quinn Shephard
Director: Desiree Akhavan
Writer (novel): Emily M. Danforth
Writer: Desiree Akhavan, Cecilia Frugiuele
Cinematographer: Ashley Connor
Editor: Sara Shaw
Composer: Julian Wass

“All About Nina” by Eva Vives (2018)

first feature

All About Nina

Impressive first feature combining drama and comedy, depth and spontaneity; fantastic acting by Winstead
“Vives (and Winstead) really understand this prickly armored woman, a woman who weeps with sadness after a great night, whose anger isn’t obliterated magically by the possibility of joy. “All About Nina” understands that happiness can be extremely stressful. If you’re unused to happiness, you don’t know what to do with it. You may, in fact, deliberately torch it, just so you can get back to the misery that is familiar. Not too many films—really, not too many people—understand this dynamic.” [Sheila O’Malley]

Cast: Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Common, Chace Crawford, Clea Duvall, Kate del Castillo, Beau Bridges
Director: Eva Vives
Writer: Eva Vives
Cinematographer: Thomas Scott Stanton
Editor: Saira Haider, Susan Littenberg
Composer: John Dragonetti

“Dude” by Olivia Milch (2018)

first feature

Dude

Some good girly dialogues but shallow script

Cast: Lucy Hale, Kathryn Prescott, Alexandra Shipp
Director: Olivia Milch
Writers: Olivia Milch
Cinematography by Hillary Spera
Film Editing by Annette Davey

“Let The Sunshine In” by Claire Denis (2017)

A post by Mireia Marti from Barcelona

Let the sunshine in

Claire Denis leads you to a place and leaves you wondering how you got there!
A movie about true love, extraordinarily cohesive, that breaks all rules! A masterpiece!
“The self-destructive nature of searching for meaning, for a partner, has long fascinated the filmmaker, and here she strips bare that hopeless pursuit.” by Greg Cwik.
“The film’s confidence comes in part from the acceptance of the things that can’t be known.” by Glenn Kenny.

Cast: Juliette Binoche, Xavier Beauvois, Philippe Katerine, Josiane Balasko, Gérard Depardieu, Alex Descas
Director: Claire Denis
Book: Roland Barthes
Screenplay: Claire Denis, Christine Angot
Director of Photography: Agnès Godard
Editor: Guy Lecorne
Original Music Composer: Stuart Staples

“The Land Of Steady Habits” by Nicole Holofcener (2018)

6 Mondays with Nicole Holofcener (6)

The Land of Steady Habits

A finely-structured movie that shows the difficulties that men as young adults and during their midlife-crisis encounter as they try to find their place in a society that asks them to grow up. Immaturity is so difficult to live, whatever one’s age!
This movie parallels Nicole Holofcener’s preceding one, but instead of being centered on a middle-aged woman who has a daughter and develops a close relationship with the best friend of her daughter, it focuses on a middle-aged man, his son, and the close relationship that this man develops with the best friend of his son.

Cast: Ben Mendelsohn, Edie Falco, Thomas Mann, Elizabeth Marvel, Connie Britton, Michael Gaston, Josh Pais, Charlie Tahan
Director: Nicole Holofcener
Writer: Nicole Holofcener
Cinematographer: Alar Kivilo
Editor: Robert Frazen
Composer: Marcelo Zarvos

“Enough Said” by Nicole Holofcener (2013)

6 Mondays with Nicole Holofcener (5)

Enough Said

Excellent acting in a finely-tuned story about the life and relationships of a middle-aged divorced mother

Cast: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, James Gandolfini, Catherine Keener, Ben Falcone, Toni Collette, Amy Landecker, Michaela Watkins
Director: Nicole Holofcener
Writer: Nicole Holofcener
Music by Marcelo Zarvos
Cinematography by Xavier Grobet
Film Editing by Robert Frazen

“Slums Of Beverly Hills” by Tamara Jenkins (1998)

3 Movies by Tamara Jenkins (1)

Slums of Beverly Hills

Fun!

Cast: Natasha Lyonne, Alan Arkin, Bryna Weiss
Director: Tamara Jenkins
Writer: Tamara Jenkins
Music by Rolfe Kent
Cinematography by Tom Richmond
Film Editing by Pamela Martin

“Walking And Talking” by Nicole Holofcener (1996 )

6 Mondays with Nicole Holofcener (1)

walking and talking

The friendship between two young women living in New York

Cast: Catherine Keener, Anne Heche, Liev Schreiber, Todd Field, Joseph Siravo
Written and Directed by Nicole Holofcener
Music by Billy Bragg
Cinematography by Michael Spiller
Film Editing by Alisa Lepselter

“Lost and Delirious” by Lea Pool (2001)

5 Fridays with Lea Pool (2)

Lost and Delirious

“a hymn to teenage idealism and hormones” (Roger Ebert)
The usual Lea Pool’s family situations – difficult but crucial mother-daughter relationships and absent fathers – play a role in the background

Cast: Piper Perabo, Jessica Pare, Jackie Burroughs
Directed by Lea Pool
Written by Judith Thompson
Music by Robyn Schulkowsky
Cinematography by Jeanne Lapoirie
Film Editing by Michel Arcand

“Somersault” by Cate Shortland (2004)

first feature

Somersault

Weak scenario, shallow personages

Cast: Abbie Cornish, Sam Worthington, Lynette Curran
Director: Cate Shortland
Writer: Cate Shortland
Music by Decoder Ring
Cinematography by Robert Humphreys
Film Editing by Scott Gray

“To Each, Her Own” by Myriam Aziza (2018)

second feature

to each her own

A Jewish lesbian falls for a Muslim Black
Performances lack cohesion but message is welcome

Cast: Sarah Stern, Jean-Christophe Folly, Julia Piaton
Director: Myriam Aziza
Writers: Myriam Aziza, Denyse Rodriguez-Tomé
Music by Martin Rappeneau
Cinematography by Benoît Chamaillard
Film Editing by Vincent Zuffranieri

“Appropriate Behavior” by Desiree Akhavan (2014)

first feature

Appropriate Behavior

What does ‘appropriate behavior’mean for someone who doesn’t fit anywhere?

Cast: Desiree Akhavan, Rebecca Henderson, Halley Feiffer, Scott Adsit, Anh Duong
Director: Desiree Akhavan
Screenplay: Desiree Akhavan
Music by Josephine Wiggs
Cinematography by Chris Teague
Film Editing by Sara Shaw

“Miss Stevens” by Julia Hart (2016)

first feature

Miss Stevens

A young female teacher has a short-lived sex-only relationship with another teacher but feels a deeper attraction for one of her students, which she has to resist

Cast: Lily Rabe, Lili Reinhart, Anthony Quintal, Timothée Chalamet, Pamela Drake Wilson, David Faulkner
Director: Julia Hart
Writer: Julia Hart, Jordan Horowitz
Cinematographer: Sebastian Winterø
Editor: Amy McGrath, Lee Haugen

“Blockers” by Kay Cannon (2018)

Blockers

Sex and the (millenial) generation gap

Cast: Leslie Mann, Ike Barinholtz, John Cena, Kathryn Newton, Geraldine Viswanathan, Gideon Adlon
Director: Kay Cannon
Writer: Brian Kehoe, Jim Kehoe
Cinematographer: Russ T. Alsobrook
Editor: Stacey Schroeder
Composer: Mateo Messina

“Outside In” by Lynn Shelton (2017)

Outside in

A focused, “quiet, deeply empathetic film” (Allison Shoemaker) / Formidable performance by Edie Falco

Cast: Edie Falco, Jay Duplass, Kaitlyn Dever, Ben Schwartz, Aaron Blakely, Claudine Nako
Director: Lynn Shelton
Writer: Jay Duplass, Lynn Shelton
Cinematographer: Nathan M. Miller
Editor: Celia Beasley
Composer: Andrew Bird

“The Feels” by Jenée LaMarque (2017)

The Feels

Another approach to ‘a young woman in search of her identity’ / Team work gives a very nice ‘feel’ to the movie

Cast: Constance Wu, Josh Fadem, Jenée LaMarque
Director: Jenée LaMarque
Writers: Jenée LaMarque, Lauren Parks
Music by Julian Wass
Cinematography by Kristin Fieldhouse
Film Editing by Steph Zenee Perez

“Social Animals” by Theresa Bennett (USA, 2018)

 

First feature

Social Animals

Predictable and overdone, but good dialogues and humor

Cast: Noel Wells, Carly Chaikin, Aya Cash, Josh Radnor
Director: Theresa Bennett
Writer: Theresa Bennett
Cinematographer: Sandra Valde-Hansen
Editor: Yaniv Dabach, Jonathan Melin

“Reinventing Marvin” by Anne Fontaine (France, 2017)

 

Reinventing Marvin

A young gay man stages a theater play about his youth, which enables him to distance himself from the environment where he grew up and allows him to come to term with it / Excellent scenario “like a postmodern collage” [Diego Semerene

Cast: Finnegan Oldfield, Grégory Gadebois, Vincent Macaigne
Director: Anne Fontaine
Writers: Pierre Trividic, Anne Fontaine
Cinematography by Yves Angelo
Film Editing by Annette Dutertre

“Revenge” by Coralie Fargeat (France, 2017)

 

Revenge

fantastic photography and camera work… and a flood of blood!

Cast: Matilda Anna Ingrid Lutz, Kevin Janssens, Vincent Colombe, Guillaume Bouchède
Director: Coralie Fargeat
Writer: Coralie Fargeat
Director of Photography: Robrecht Heyvaert
Editor: Coralie Fargeat, Bruno Safar, Jérôme Eltabet
Music: Robin Coudert

“Pure” by Lisa Langseth (Sweden, 2010)

Pure

Outstanding acting by Vikander / a not really focused and a bit chaotic musical choice / original title: To What’s Beautiful

Cast: Alicia Vikander, Samuel Fröler, Josephine Bauer
Director: Lisa Langseth
Writer: Lisa Langseth
Music by Per-Erik Winberg
Cinematography by Simon Pramsten
Film Editing by Malin Lindström

“Altered Perception” by Kate Rees Davies (USA, 2017)

first feature / cinema of substance

Altered Perception

With its strong but disturbing message, its unconventional camera work. and its very original script, this movie deserves a much more encouraging reaction, but it seems that few critics ventured to see it. Or is it because the pharmaceutical industry has been lobbying around? 🙂
Very original first feature in the trend “cinema-vérirté” / Nice team-work although at times awkwardly amateurish / Pity Kate Davies didn’t find it necessary to provide the viewer with a cinematic conclusion other than a few quotes from Forbes and Vanity Fair.

Cast:  Jon Huertas, Jennifer Blanc-Biehn, Mark Burnham
Director: Kate Rees Davies
Writers: Jennifer Blanc-Biehn, Jon Huertas, Travis Romero
Music by Randy Chance
Cinematography by Steve Romano
Film Editing by Jon Artigo, Vance Crofoot

“Augustine” by Alice Winocour (France, 2012)

first feature / cinema of substance

Augustine

Jean-Martin Charcot, a 19th-century neurologist famous for his work on female hysteria, owes his success to the influence of his wife and the capacity of his favorite patient to ‘fake’ her seizures.

Cast: Soko, Chiara Mastroianni, Olivier Rabourdin, Vincent Lindon, Grégoire Colin, Roxane Duran, Sophie Cattani
Director: Alice Winocour
Music by Jocelyn Pook
Cinematography by Georges Lechaptois
Film Editing by Julien Lacheray

“Lucky Them” by Megan Griffiths (USA, 2013)

Lucky Them

Good dialogues and humor, with a movie within the movie

Cast: Toni Collette, Thomas Haden Church, Oliver Platt, Ryan Eggold, Ahna O’Reilly, Amy Seimetz, Joanne Woodward, Lynn Shelton, Johnny Depp
Director: Megan Griffiths
Screenplay: Huck Botko, Emily Wachtel
Music by Craig Wedren
Cinematography by Ben Kutchins
Film Editing by Meg Reticker

“Eden” by Megan Griffiths (USA, 2012)

Eden_2012

Cast: Jamie Chung, Beau Bridges, Matt O’Leary
Director: Megan Griffiths
Writers: Richard B. Phillips, Megan Griffiths
Music by Matthew Emerson Brown, Jeramy Koepping, Joshua Morrison
Cinematography by Sean Porter
Film Editing by Eric Frith

“Things Behind The Sun” by Allison Anders (USA, 2001)

Things behind the sun

A woman who has been gang-raped when she was young comes to term with her past when she hears what really happened from the one who was her boyfriend at the time. A hard film to watch!
Just like in her preceding movie, music is used to help defining the personage and carrying the emotional content.

Cast: Kim Dickens, Gabriel Mann, Aria Alpert Adjani
Director: Allison Anders
Writers: Allison Anders, Kurt Voss
Music by Sonic Youth
Cinematography by Terry Stacey
Film Editing by Chris Figler

“Gas, Food, Lodging” by Allison Anders (USA, 1993)

Gas, Food, Lodging

Surprising, great personages

Cast: Brooke Adams, Ione Skye, Fairuza Balk
Director: Allison Anders
Writers: Richard Peck (novel), Allison Anders (screenplay)
Music by J. Mascis
Cinematography by Dean Lent
Film Editing by Tracy Granger

“The Falling” by Carol Morley (USA, 2014)

the falling

A girl grieves for her best friend

Cast: Maxine Peake, Maisie Williams, Florence Pugh
Director: Carol Morley
Writer: Carol Morley
Music by Tracey Thorn
Cinematography by Agnès Godard
Film Editing by Chris Wyatt

“And While We Were Here” by Kat Coiro (USA, 2012)

And While We Were Here

An affair with a younger man liberates a woman from the dead relationship she has with her husband / Good characters

Cast: Kate Bosworth, Iddo Goldberg, Claire Bloom
Director: Kat Coiro
Writer: Kat Coiro
Music by Mateo Messina
Cinematography by Doug Chamberlain
Film Editing by Adam Catino

“Life Happens” by Kat Coiro (USA, 2011)

Life Happens

At times witty but pointless dialogues

Cast: Krysten Ritter, Kate Bosworth, Rachel Bilson
Director: Kat Coiro
Writers: Kat Coiro, Krysten Ritter
Music by Mateo Messina
Cinematography by Doug Chamberlain
Film Editing by Adam Catino, Eli Nilsen