“The Glass Castle” by Destin Cretton (USA, 2017)

A few recent movies on fatherhood

The Glass Castle

Love your father no matter what / You can’t live with yourself and reject where you come from… These are a few of the messages in this ode to the family that is in fact a glorification of patriarchy and that ends in syrupy sentimentality / Ill-adapted flashbacks

Cast: Brie Larson, Naomi Watts, Woody Harrelson, Max Greenfield, Ella Anderson, Sarah Snook, Olivia Kate Rice, Dominic Bogart Shree Crooks, Charlie Shotwell, Sadie Sink
Director: Destin Cretton
Writer (based upon the book by) Jeannette Walls
Writer: Destin Cretton, Andrew Lanham
Cinematographer: Brett Pawlak
Editor: Nat Sanders
Composer: Joel P. West

Advertisements

“Professor Marston & The Wonder Woman” by Angela Robinson (USA, 2017)

Professor Marston and the Wonder Woman

Powerful story and strong content that the director doesn’t fully control

“It’s a timely affirmation of feminine power—of the ways in which female wisdom and strength can charge hearts and minds, influence culture and inspire others to be their most authentic selves. That was certainly true of this summer’s origin story, with its deeply moving lead performance from Gal Gadot, and it’s true again here in the origin story behind that origin story.” Christy Lemire

Cast: Luke Evans, Rebecca Hall, Bella Heathcote, Allie Gallerani, Christopher Jon Gombos, J. J. Feild, Connie Britton
Director:
Writer: Angela Robinson
Cinematographer: Bryce Fortner
Editor: Jeffrey M. Werner
Composer: Tom Howe

“Agora” by Alejandro Amenabar (Spain, 2009)

Agora.PNG

This movie shows that both science and religion are motivated by faith. Ultimately, however, religion becomes a political power, science not. It also shows that all power feeds itself on minorities!

Cast: Rachel Weisz, Max Minghella, Oscar Isaac, Ashraf Barhom, Rupert Evans, Michael Lonsdale
Directed by Alejandro Amenabar
Written by Amenabar, Mateo Gil
Music by Dario Marianelli
Cinematography by Xavi Giménez
Film Editing by Nacho Ruiz Capillas

“The Battle Of The Sexes” by Jonathan Dayton & Valerie Faris (USA, 2017)

Working in pair: man + woman directing

The Battle Of The Sexes

Too predictable and at times grotesque

Cast: Emma Stone, Steve Carell, Andrea Riseborough, Sarah Silverman, Alan Cumming
Director: Jonathan Dayton, Valerie Faris
Writer: Simon Beaufoy
Cinematographer: Linus Sandgren
Editor: Pamela Martin
Composer: Nicholas Britell

“Alias Grace” by Mary Harron (Canada, 2017)

Alias Grace

The many facets of truth!
Gender roles in Victorian Canada / Excellent female lead

Cast: Sarah Gadon, Edward Holcroft, Rebecca Liddiard, David Cronenberg, Anna Paquin
Director: Mary Harron
Script: Margaret Atwood, Sarah Polley
Cinematography: Brendan Steacy
Music: Jeff Danna, Mychael Danna

“Maudie” by Aisling Walsh (Ireland, 2016)

Maudie

Happiness doesn’t need much and can be learned.
One negative point: Ethan Hawke doesn’t fit the personage.

Cast: Sally Hawkins, Ethan Hawke, Gabrielle Rose, Billy MacLellan, Zachary Bennett, Kari Matchett
Director: Aisling Walsh
Writer: Sherry White
Cinematographer: Guy Godfree
Editor: Stephen O’Connell
Composer: Michael Timmins

“The Nativity Story” by Catherine Hardwicke (USA, 2006)

The Nativity Story

Besides the difficulties Mary has in her village for being pregnant without having ‘known a man’, nothing in this movie brings any inspiration to a story that certainly needs a more critical approach. The church music sinks the movie irredeemably.

Cast: Keisha Castle-Hughes, Shohreh Aghdashloo, Oscar Isaac
Director: Catherine Hardwicke
Writer: Mike Rich
Music by Mychael Danna
Cinematography by Elliot Davis
Film Editing by Robert K. Lambert, Stuart Levy